The Thing About Medicine…

Ever since I was diagnosed, I was forced to take a pill every single day. The pill that I take is a synthetic thyroid hormone replacement. Yay! No, not really.

I started off with Synthroid, then when my doctor increased my medication, she also switched me to another kind, which is Levothyroxine.

I recently noticed symptoms could be tied to this. How? I don’t recommend this by any means, but I have missed my medication a couple of times and realized how much better I felt. My mind is clear and I didn’t sleep all durn day like I usually do. I’m not quite sure when my bouts of extreme lethargy came about but I believe it has something to do with my medication.

Taken from the Mayo Clinic Website:

Hair loss may occur during the first few months of treatment. This effect is usually temporary as your body adjusts to this medication. If this effect persists or worsens, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: increased sweating, sensitivity to heat, mental/mood changes (such as nervousness, mood swings), tiredness, diarrhea, shaking (tremor),headache, shortness of breath.

Get medical help right away if any of these rare but serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: chest pain, fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, swelling hands/ankles/feetseizures.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash,itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizzinesstrouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

That is a long list of symptoms, in my opinion, and–as noted at the bottom–it’s not the complete list.

To be honest, I recently had to drop out of school because of some of these symptoms. When I do inform my doctor, as suggested by many drug information sites, they go unaddressed or dismissed. She will check my levels, then tell me they are normal. Even one day when I forgot to take my medication. I have no idea what to make of that.

I don’t think that doctors are doing enough for thyroid diseases. I think it’s more than a synthetic pill. I think that some doctors must listen to their patients when they list A LOT of symptoms instead of either dismissing or throwing medications or advice of, say, psychiatric treatment, antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications, or weight loss pills. Those mask symptoms and do not relieve them one bit. Well, in my case.

Mary Shomon, a thyroid guru, discusses desiccated thyroid. She speaks on the “controversy” between synthetic and natural thyroid hormone replacement. Just from the sound of it, natural always sounds better than something man made. People tend to flock to new innovations without thinking of possible complications or failures; because it’s new, it has to be better.

I do not know much about desiccated thyroid, but I hope to look into it, as well as find an endocrinologist who will listen and actually help instead of talk about me with her aids and tossing me out of the office while dismissing my symptoms.

Until next time 😦

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What to eat, what to eat. Hmmmmm.

It’s quite difficult even looking into this subject. Even the list I’ve created may not be quite accurate. I’ve also mentioned goitrogens before and what they do to those with thyroid problems. So, figuring out what to eat to optimize thyroid health, or to make sure the body can absorb the thyroid hormone, or that production is not inhibited, avoiding goitrogens should be avoided.

I’ve also found out about nightshade vegetables and gluten. I’m still looking into these and will post my findings soon.

I’ve come across many websites that focus on health or solely on hypothyroidism. They offer lists, and this one disappointed me so. It’s as if there aren’t any actual lists. The one I found simply said what others have said. I wish there were more comprehensive lists that could tell exactly what to eat and what not to eat.

I’m currently trying The Flat Belly Diet. I love what the plan has to offer and believe it may be helpful to me and my journey to better health. I think for this diet, I must make some adjustments.

Keeping in mind what is safe or unsafe for my condition, I can make those adjustments… It’s just a bit hard. I’ve found helpful websites, one called Thyroid U and a facebook page called Thyroid Sexy. They offer wonderful advice, yet I still feel that there’s more to know. Sometimes the information found is conflicting. Like the case of almonds.

By trying out this diet plan, I hope to gain energy and a flat belly and hopefully ease some of the symptoms associated with my illness. The plan focuses on MUFAs and less carbohydrate intake. I know for a fact that my body does not like excess carbs. I get a throbbing pain and I will fall asleep way fast after eating them. I know that my body does not like them at all, so I try not to eat too many of them. I can eat fish and other things they suggest. I hope to start once I complete the book.

If you know anything about foods to eat or foods to avoid with hypothyroidism, please let me know. Your advice is welcomed.

Note: This is not a blog by an expert but one by a patient. This is my journey and I wish to share it with others and also hope that others will share with me.

It can be really confusing…

I have so many questions to ask my doctor and yet, I feel like an idiot asking. I’m always tired. I’m only 24, and was diagnosed at 19 or 20 with a disease that is common in older adults. I still don’t know why I have it. All I know is, I’m usually tired and fatigued, have dry skin, and can never concentrate! I also struggle with depression. That said, I wanted to put this out there: I have many questions that I hope to ask a good doctor that is very familiar with the disorder.

  1. Why me? Why do I have hypothyroidism?
  2. I hear things about food and hypothyroidism. Some say that people should stay away from foods that contain soy, gluten, and goitrogens. Can you tell me why is this?
  3. I’m taking a synthetic hormone, synthroid, to treat my hypothyroidism. Why do I still struggle with the symptoms?
  4. Will this disease get any worse? If so, how can I prevent that?
  5. Are there natural ways to help my thyroid function?

I’ve yet to find out a lot of these answers. While I have checked out websites and books concerning hypothyroidism, I have not found any information that pertains to me.

I still try to stay away from certain foods, as warned by some sources, but, I’m still a bit confused. I’ve said before that sites such as Stop The Thyroid Madness helps some because it gives a good idea about what others have been through and it also gives information on foods to eat less of. There are other sites, like the Synthroid website, that says reducing the consumption of these foods have no impact on thyroid levels.

While a change in my lifestyle is the best way to go, I’m taking steps that have been used by some that have been successful. (I’m still learning.) Some cut out soy all together, which is difficult. Some cut out gluten, which further complicates things. I will say that I do notice a difference in my joints and energy levels when I stay away from carbs and sugar. So right now, I’m going to follow what makes me feel better and relieves some of the symptoms that my medication doesn’t.

Other than that, I hope to dig deeper for more information concerning hypothyroidism and why I have it.

 

 

http://www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/hypothyroidism/risk-factors-hypothyroidism

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hypothyroidism-topic-overview

Goitrogens: My new enemy!

Originally, I assumed that I just had to take my thyroid medication and that would be it. For the rest of my life, this little pill would do the trick. But no. What I wasn’t told was that certain foods harm the thyroid gland and it’s production of the hormone . The thing that is in the food that causes such a disturbance is goitrogens.

Goitrogens are naturally occurring in some foods. They are in a lot of foods that I did not suspect. (I will be back with a list.)

Now, I don’t have to eliminate the foods completely, but take a different approach to them. Dr. Marcelle Pick, from Woman to Woman’s healthy website, said that avoidance is unnecessary and that people are missing out on nutritious foods by giving these foods their marching orders from your diet.

Thryoid and the body. Easing up on goitrogens can lessen these symptoms.

How do goitrogens work?

Goitrogens disrupt thyroid function. If eaten in excess, this can be a problem for someone with hypothyroidism. According to Stop the Thyroid Madness, goitrogens can interfere with the function of the thyroid.

Goitrogens disrupts the production of the hormones, T3 and T4, and with a sluggish thyroid, not much of the hormone is being produced as is. With the hypothyroidism and the goitrogens combined in the body, the thyroid is unable to produce or the body is unable to adsorb the correct amount of the hormone. As you can see, this is disruptive to the important functions of the body.

So to give up or not to give up? 

So from three useful sources, I have found one word that describes what should be done if concerned about goitrogens: moderation. While I have harshly restricted this from my diet, I do plan to incorporate some into it. Before this, I was eating soy and goitrogens with little attention paid. Now, I hope to limit and not avoid, because they do still have great health benefits.

Dr. Pick does not believe that these should be given up due to the fact that these vegetables provide important nutrients that women should not miss out on.

“Women with thyroid problems definitely should not avoid them,” Dr. Pick says. ” Instead, enjoy them steamed or cooked, as the heat alters the isothiocyanates’ molecular structure and eliminates the goitrogenic effect.”

The Pathmed website says this about consumption.

A standard, one cup serving of cruciferous vegetables 2-3 times per week, and a standard, 4-ounce serving of tofu twice a week is likely to be tolerated by many individuals with thyroid hormone deficiency. It’s worth it to try and include these foods in a meal plan because of their strong nutritional value and great track record in preventing many kinds of health problems. 

Now what?

I do enjoy some of the foods and plan to incorporate them into my diet. But I’m still mindful of what they can do. I will still focus on the list I’ve created, but not feel guilty for eating some foods that contain goitrogens, soy especially.

It’s also important to add foods that support the thyroid. A few including iodine rich foods. I hope to discuss more of these as I find out something new about this daily!

These are a few good sites to check out for more information concerning thyroid function and goitrogens.

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/goitrogens/

http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyroidism/goitrogenicfoods-thyroidhealth.aspx

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-thyroid

http://www.pathmed.com/faq/?p=368

http://nourishedkitchen.com/foods-thyroid-health/

Oh The Horror: Being Diagnosed With a Disease That You Have Little Control Over

So, I have hypothyroidism. I hate it. It sucks. This disease will change a lot about a person. Facially, I’ve experienced swelling to the point that I was no longer pretty to myself. I’ve been overweight with little control. I’ve been soooo tired that I was unable to move most days. 

I just never thought I’d ever experience something like this.

So, what happened? I went to the doctor and was immediately put on thyroid medication. Originally, Syntrhoid at a low dosage. All problems solved. Until, recently when I began crying more than usual and my weight soared to about 30 more pounds over. I tried everything to lose weight. Then, I gave up. 

My doctor’s solution was diet pills. Diet pills… My medication was also increased. 

I knew for a while this awful truth: Your doctor will not tell you everything. So what is a person to do? Research on your own. Come to find out, there was a lot out there in the inter-webs. There were women telling their experiences with this disorder. There were experts. I learned that I didn’t have to just settle for the minimum treatment. 

Right now, I’m sleepier than ever, slower than ever, experiencing stiffness and swelling in my joints… My brain fog is so thick, I do wonder how I make it from day to day on tasks that require thinking. I did lose about 20 lb. which is a plus side. But it’s not enough. I want to have my old self again. Where do I start? Luckily there’s helpful advice out there, and a new doctor I can check out about correcting this thing. 🙂

I hope to find answers. I bought two books, one an information laden paper back and the other a cook book. I’ve also joined two Facebook pages, talk to my friend about the disorder, and do internet searches just about daily. I think this is the starting point. 🙂

I’m Ashley, and I’m hypothyroid. Oh yes I am :). 

Oh The Horror: Being Diagnosed With a Disease That You Have Little Control Over

So, I have hypothyroidism. I hate it. It sucks. This disease will change a lot about a person. Facially, I’ve experienced swelling to the point that I was no longer pretty to myself. I’ve been overweight with little control. I’ve been soooo tired that I was unable to move most days. 

I just never thought I’d ever experience something like this.

So, what happened? I went to the doctor and was immediately put on thyroid medication. Originally, Syntrhoid at a low dosage. All problems solved. Until, recently when I began crying more than usual and my weight soared to about 30 more pounds over. I tried everything to lose weight. Then, I gave up. 

My doctor’s solution was diet pills. Diet pills… My medication was also increased. 

I knew for a while this awful truth: Your doctor will not tell you everything. So what is a person to do? Research on your own. Come to find out, there was a lot out there in the inter-webs. There were women telling their experiences with this disorder. There were experts. I learned that I didn’t have to just settle for the minimum treatment. 

Right now, I’m sleepier than ever, slower than ever, experiencing stiffness and swelling in my joints… My brain fog is so thick, I do wonder how I make it from day to day on tasks that require thinking. I did lose about 20 lb. which is a plus side. But it’s not enough. I want to have my old self again. Where do I start? Luckily there’s helpful advice out there, and a new doctor I can check out about correcting this thing. 🙂

I hope to find answers. I bought two books, one an information laden paper back and the other a cook book. I’ve also joined two Facebook pages, talk to my friend about the disorder, and do internet searches just about daily. I think this is the starting point. 🙂

I’m Ashley, and I’m hypothyroid. Oh yes I am :). 

Hello world!

Student. Hypothyroidism. Yea.

I am on a journey to treat some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism through nutrition and fitness.

I’ve chosen to become a lacto-ovo vegetarian. While some think this is not necessary, I think it’s my choice and an exciting journey to boot!

So far, it’s been hell. But I’m ready to change for the better!